IntriguingHistory

HISTORY is MORE than just names and dates

Archive for the category “Uncategorized”

Confederate Monuments: Dealing with Tough History

Unveiling of Confederate monument, Arlington Cemetery, Va., June 4, 1914. National Photo Company Collection (Library of Congress)

In Ulysses S. Grant’s first inaugural address in March 1869, he discussed the way in which each section of the country should come together and settle their differences after the Civil War. He stated that it should be “approached calmly, without prejudice, hate, or sectional pride, remembering that the greatest good to the greatest number is the object to be attained.”

Grant’s words are more relevant than ever. The Civil War is still remembered in history books, museums, artifacts, reenactments, and preserved battlefields. It is a scar that is not going away any time soon. The memory of that war continues to shape social ideologies and political discourse in this country.

Read more…

Advertisements

The First Completely Annotated Edition of Ulysses S. Grant’s Personal Memoirs

9780674976290-lg

 

The Personal Memoirs of U.S. Grant are widely considered to be one of the most well-written pieces of non-fiction American literature. Mark Twain, a close friend of Grant’s and whose company published the first edition of the memoirs, called them ‘a great, unique and unapproachable literary masterpiece.’ The memoirs have been in continuous print since their original publication in 1885, which highlights the historical impact of the book. However, in those 130 years, no one has ever thoroughly contextualized the memoirs for the modern reader, until now. Just recently, the Ulysses S. Grant Association, under the management of the Executive Director John F. Marszalek, has announced an upcoming publication of the first comprehensively annotated edition of Grant’s memoirs. Published by Harvard University Press’s Belknap imprint, it will be available for purchase in September 2017.

This newest edition of Grant’s memoirs contains over 2,000 explanatory notes, which identifies nearly every person that Grant mentions, elaborates on details that Grant might have missed, and corrects him if he made an error. All of the scholarly notes that are included in this edition will be invaluable to researchers, historians, academics, and more importantly the casual reader.

Interestingly enough, Grant did not see himself as a writer, nor did he assume that people were interested in hearing his take on the Civil War. However, in June 1884, Grant’s financial trouble, and a diagnosis of severe throat and mouth cancer, forced him to reconsider his abilities as a writer. Immediately after his diagnosis, he began to compose his life story. The oncoming threat of death did not deter Grant. He was determined to complete his memoirs so he could leave his family with a hardy income. With astounding clarity, Grant was able to capture the essence of his early life and detail his personal experience in the Civil War. The general public was enamored by Grant’s direct and lucid writing style.

Sadly, Grant passed away only four days after completing his manuscript, so he was never able to see just how successful and well-received his memoirs would become. Hopefully, this latest edition will add to the historical value of the memoirs, and provide every student of American history with a more nuanced perspective of Grant.

If you are interested in purchasing this invaluable piece of Grant scholarship, you can visit any bookstore or online retailer. Or, you can purchase the book through Harvard, here:
http://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674976290

 

Louie P. Gallo

lpg58@msstate.edu

Hancock County, West Virginia and the Start of the Civil War

Virginia, the home state of Confederate General Robert E. Lee, was notably divided during the Civil War. The growing factions were evident in the state’s most northern reaches. In May 1861, pro-Unionists in Hancock County, VA(now West Virginia), decided to organize a company of men to help fulfill President Abraham Lincoln’s call for 75,000 volunteers. The enlistments were for only three months, but those men quickly cemented their place in history by fighting in the first military land engagement of the Civil War, which catapulted Union General George B. McClellan to the national stage.

Read more…

David Farragut: One of the Youngest Midshipman in American Naval History

30cfe93934f73c5369953ccc3c03ce8c

David Farragut was one of the most well-known Naval Commanders of the Civil War, but his intriguing life-story began at a surprisingly early age.

Read more…

The Yellow Creek Massacre: A Turning Point in American History

#TBT

IntriguingHistory

A Mingo Warrior A Mingo Warrior

On April 30, 1774, a posse of armed settlers murdered a group of unsuspecting Native Americans in cold blood along the banks of the Ohio River, near the mouth of Yellow Creek. The incident, also known as the Yellow Creek Massacre, was so momentous that Thomas Jefferson, as a delegate in the Virginia House of Burgesses, called it “inhumane” and “indecent”, and he mentioned it in the only book he ever published, Notes on the State of Virginia.

View original post 1,840 more words

American Pharoah and the Essence of the Triple Crown

Here is an article that discusses the relationship between history and horse racing.

GATE TO WIRE

American Pharoah winning the Kentucky Derby

In 1973, The United States was in turmoil. Between the long and arduous Vietnam War, and the controversial Watergate scandal, Americans were left listless. The country needed a common figure they could rally around in order to reinvigorate their convictions and their morale. The answer was found in a majestic colt named Secretariat. With his red coat, blue and white silks, and a strong will and sense of determination, Secretariat embodied American pride. On the first Saturday of May in 1973, Secretariat captured the country’s attention when he easily won the Kentucky Derby. Only two weeks later on May 19, he won the Preakness Stakes in easy fashion. Finally, on June 9, less than three weeks after President Nixon revealed his involvement in the Watergate scandal, Secretariat secured his place in history, by winning the Belmont Stakes by an amazing 31 lengths. It was hands down, the most perfect display…

View original post 337 more words

Ulysses S. Grant Presidential Library on Facebook and Twitter

229952_522456367783298_1573154629_n

If you are on Facebook or Twitter, head over to the Ulysses S. Grant Presidential Library’s page and give it a Like and/or a Share! 

Here are the links:
https://www.facebook.com/USGrantLibrary
AND
https://twitter.com/USGrantLibrary

Spread the word!

Thanks!

1,000 HITS!!!!!

We have hit 1,000 views! I can’t thank you guys enough for the support. As long as you support this blog, I will do everything in my power to keep posting obscure history articles.

THANK YOU!

Martha Ballard: American History Through a Woman’s Perspective

Image

During the late 1700s, Martha Ballard was a midwife living in Maine. In life, she was not famous or well known, but her personal diary made her an important part of history, because it revealed the obscured viewpoint of early American women. Ballard’s diary entries covered topics, including textile production, dissections, courtship and marriage, money, the Scarlet Fever epidemic, premarital pregnancy, and the horrific Purrinton Murders.

Read more…

Image

 *500 Total Views*

Intruiginghistory now has over 500 total views!!! I can’t thank everyone enough for all of your support! With a little bit of passion history can be intriguing! Here is to more wacky, random, unique historical narratives! As long as I have viewers, I will be making posts! Thank You again for your valuable time and support!

-Louie

Post Navigation