IntriguingHistory

HISTORY is MORE than just names and dates

The Humble Origins of Horse Racing in Northeastern Ohio

Letter from Lyman Potter to Calvin G. Sutliff

                Recently, while researching letters from the Sutliff Collection, I discovered a letter from a man named Lyman Potter to Calvin G. Sutliff in Vernon, Ohio. In the letter, Potter asks Sutliff to train one of his horses, just as he “would a race horse.” From my research, I have concluded the letter was written around 1826, and it represents the popularity of horse racing in America, well before the first running of the Kentucky Derby in 1875. This essay will examine the humble origins of American horse racing in Northeastern Ohio.

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Martha Ballard: American History Through a Woman’s Perspective

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During the late 1700s, Martha Ballard was a midwife living in Maine. In life, she was not famous or well known, but her personal diary made her an important part of history, because it revealed the obscured viewpoint of early American women. Ballard’s diary entries covered topics, including textile production, dissections, courtship and marriage, money, the Scarlet Fever epidemic, premarital pregnancy, and the horrific Purrinton Murders.

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Intruiginghistory now has over 500 total views!!! I can’t thank everyone enough for all of your support! With a little bit of passion history can be intriguing! Here is to more wacky, random, unique historical narratives! As long as I have viewers, I will be making posts! Thank You again for your valuable time and support!

-Louie

Ricketts’ Circus: George Washington and Americas First Circus, 1793

John B. Ricketts

John B. Ricketts

Obviously, nearly every American knows who George Washington was, and the role he played in American history. However, did you know that the battle hardened General and astute President loved the circus?

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Dueling Pianos: Muzio Clementi vs. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

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Can you imagine the scene? It is Christmas Eve in 1781 at the Royal Viennese Court, and everyone, including the Holy Roman Emperor Joseph II, is waiting for the piano duel to commence. Sitting at one piano is a well established Italian composer, Muzio Clementi, and at the other is the most anticipated prodigy of his time, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

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A Cross to Bare

DISCLAIMER: This short story is purely a work of historical fiction. I wanted to write a factitious and allegorical account of slavery while incorporating Biblical undertones. This story is the result of that idea. Pay attention, and you may be able to recognize the Biblical story I am referencing. Enjoy. 

A teenage boy and his father, with their schooner anchored, sat next to their campfire along the beach of Lake Erie in the humid summer of 1837.It had been was quite a tumultuous year for Simon and his son Joshua. Simon, a widower, made his living by using his two schooners to trade salt and flour from the shores of the Western Reserve Territory in Ohio, to the canal ridden state of New York.

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John Forsyth: The Slave Owning Secretary of State

Secretary of State John Forsyth

Secretary of State John Forsyth

During the early nineteenth century, John Forsyth was a well respected American politician. Throughout different parts of his life, he served as a Congressman, Senator, and Governor of Georgia. However, most notably, he was the Secretary of State who led the US Government’s case against the Amistad mutiny. Read more…

The Wanderer: George Shannon, The Youngest Member of the Lewis and Clark Expedition

Image   While looking over old documents in the Sutliff Collection in Warren, Ohio, I stumbled across an 1838 legal document signed by then Ohio Governor Wilson Shannon. After do some research on Shannon, I discovered that his eldest brother was George Shannon. George was the youngest member of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, and he was most well- known for one thing: getting lost. Read more…

February 14, 1814: The USS Constitution vs. the HMS Pictou

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USS Constitution

This year marks the bicentennial of the Treaty of Ghent, which ended the War of 1812. One of the most famous naval vessels from the war was the USS Constitution, or better known by the nickname “Old Ironsides”. There are many written histories about Old Ironsides.  This post will detail the clash between the USS Constitution and the HMS Pictou. The reason I chose this topic is because it occurred exactly 200 years ago to the day, on February 14, 1814. Read more…

Sister Maria Celeste Galilei

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Sister Maria Celeste Galilei

On this day, February 13th, exactly 381 years ago, Galileo Galilei arrived in Rome to face the Inquisition for his radical theories which contradicted the Bible. Nearly every lover of history and/or science has heard of the famous astronomer and physicist, but have you heard of his daughter?

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