IntriguingHistory

HISTORY is MORE than just names and dates

Archive for the tag “African-American history”

Hancock County, West Virginia and the Start of the Civil War

Virginia, the home state of Confederate General Robert E. Lee, was notably divided during the Civil War. The growing factions were evident in the state’s most northern reaches. In May 1861, pro-Unionists in Hancock County, VA(now West Virginia), decided to organize a company of men to help fulfill President Abraham Lincoln’s call for 75,000 volunteers. The enlistments were for only three months, but those men quickly cemented their place in history by fighting in the first military land engagement of the Civil War, which catapulted Union General George B. McClellan to the national stage.

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Ulysses S. Grant Presidential Library on Facebook and Twitter

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If you are on Facebook or Twitter, head over to the Ulysses S. Grant Presidential Library’s page and give it a Like and/or a Share! 

Here are the links:
https://www.facebook.com/USGrantLibrary
AND
https://twitter.com/USGrantLibrary

Spread the word!

Thanks!

Mark Twain and Ulysses S. Grant: A Phenomenal Friendship, Part 2

A few months after Twain’s hilarious speech, Grant decided to run for a third presidential term. His political supporters rallied for him. At the 1880 Republican National Convention, Grant nearly received the nomination, but James Garfield was able to secure a majority of the votes. Grant understood the implications of not receiving the candidacy. He was only making six thousand dollars a year, so he needed to make investments which would sustain his family financially.[1]

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Mark Twain and Ulysses S. Grant: A Phenomenal Friendship, Part 1

         U.S. Grant

In the summer of 1884 former president Ulysses S. Grant screamed out in pain after he took a bite from a peach. Something was wrong with his throat. At first, his wife Julia thought he was scratched by the peach’s pit or that he was stung by a bug. Unfortunately, that was not the case. Months later, after Julia convinced him to see a doctor, Grant discovered that he had throat and mouth cancer. The family was devastated by the news, but in usual fashion, Grant decided to fight. He knew that he did not have much time to live, which meant that he had to find a way to provide for his family after his death. His problems were exacerbated by failed business investments. The only solution was for him to write his autobiography. He was approached by multiple publishing companies who were interested in producing his memoirs, but at the eleventh hour, Grant met with one of America’s most famous authors, Mark Twain. Read more…

The Humble Origins of Horse Racing in Northeastern Ohio

Letter from Lyman Potter to Calvin G. Sutliff

                Recently, while researching letters from the Sutliff Collection, I discovered a letter from a man named Lyman Potter to Calvin G. Sutliff in Vernon, Ohio. In the letter, Potter asks Sutliff to train one of his horses, just as he “would a race horse.” From my research, I have concluded the letter was written around 1826, and it represents the popularity of horse racing in America, well before the first running of the Kentucky Derby in 1875. This essay will examine the humble origins of American horse racing in Northeastern Ohio.

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A Cross to Bare

DISCLAIMER: This short story is purely a work of historical fiction. I wanted to write a factitious and allegorical account of slavery while incorporating Biblical undertones. This story is the result of that idea. Pay attention, and you may be able to recognize the Biblical story I am referencing. Enjoy. 

A teenage boy and his father, with their schooner anchored, sat next to their campfire along the beach of Lake Erie in the humid summer of 1837.It had been was quite a tumultuous year for Simon and his son Joshua. Simon, a widower, made his living by using his two schooners to trade salt and flour from the shores of the Western Reserve Territory in Ohio, to the canal ridden state of New York.

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John Forsyth: The Slave Owning Secretary of State

Secretary of State John Forsyth

Secretary of State John Forsyth

During the early nineteenth century, John Forsyth was a well respected American politician. Throughout different parts of his life, he served as a Congressman, Senator, and Governor of Georgia. However, most notably, he was the Secretary of State who led the US Government’s case against the Amistad mutiny. Read more…

Congressman Joshua R. Giddings: The Measure of a Man

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Joshua R. Giddings

On December 3nd, 1838, Joshua Reed Giddings, a lawyer and an abolitionist from Ohio’s 16th congressional district was sworn in as a member of the United States House of Representatives. That day, he met his future mentor and former President, John Quincy Adams. In his diary, Giddings goes into great detail about his first encounter with Adams. He states that Adams was…

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