IntriguingHistory

HISTORY is MORE than just names and dates

Archive for the tag “america”

Hancock County, West Virginia and the Start of the Civil War

Virginia, the home state of Confederate General Robert E. Lee, was notably divided during the Civil War. The growing factions were evident in the state’s most northern reaches. In May 1861, pro-Unionists in Hancock County, VA(now West Virginia), decided to organize a company of men to help fulfill President Abraham Lincoln’s call for 75,000 volunteers. The enlistments were for only three months, but those men quickly cemented their place in history by fighting in the first military land engagement of the Civil War, which catapulted Union General George B. McClellan to the national stage.

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David Farragut: One of the Youngest Midshipman in American Naval History

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David Farragut was one of the most well-known Naval Commanders of the Civil War, but his intriguing life-story began at a surprisingly early age.

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Ulysses S. Grant Presidential Library on Facebook and Twitter

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If you are on Facebook or Twitter, head over to the Ulysses S. Grant Presidential Library’s page and give it a Like and/or a Share! 

Here are the links:
https://www.facebook.com/USGrantLibrary
AND
https://twitter.com/USGrantLibrary

Spread the word!

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1,000 HITS!!!!!

We have hit 1,000 views! I can’t thank you guys enough for the support. As long as you support this blog, I will do everything in my power to keep posting obscure history articles.

THANK YOU!

Martha Ballard: American History Through a Woman’s Perspective

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During the late 1700s, Martha Ballard was a midwife living in Maine. In life, she was not famous or well known, but her personal diary made her an important part of history, because it revealed the obscured viewpoint of early American women. Ballard’s diary entries covered topics, including textile production, dissections, courtship and marriage, money, the Scarlet Fever epidemic, premarital pregnancy, and the horrific Purrinton Murders.

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Ricketts’ Circus: George Washington and Americas First Circus, 1793

John B. Ricketts

John B. Ricketts

Obviously, nearly every American knows who George Washington was, and the role he played in American history. However, did you know that the battle hardened General and astute President loved the circus?

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John Forsyth: The Slave Owning Secretary of State

Secretary of State John Forsyth

Secretary of State John Forsyth

During the early nineteenth century, John Forsyth was a well respected American politician. Throughout different parts of his life, he served as a Congressman, Senator, and Governor of Georgia. However, most notably, he was the Secretary of State who led the US Government’s case against the Amistad mutiny. Read more…

February 14, 1814: The USS Constitution vs. the HMS Pictou

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USS Constitution

This year marks the bicentennial of the Treaty of Ghent, which ended the War of 1812. One of the most famous naval vessels from the war was the USS Constitution, or better known by the nickname “Old Ironsides”. There are many written histories about Old Ironsides.  This post will detail the clash between the USS Constitution and the HMS Pictou. The reason I chose this topic is because it occurred exactly 200 years ago to the day, on February 14, 1814. Read more…

The Yellow Creek Massacre

A Mingo Warrior

A Mingo Warrior

By: Louie P. Gallo

On April 30, 1774, a posse of armed colonists murdered a group of unsuspecting Native-Americans in cold blood along the banks of the Ohio River in modern day Hancock County, West Virginia. The Yellow Creek Massacre, was so significant that Thomas Jefferson mentioned it in the only book he ever published, Notes on the State of Virginia. He called the killings “inhumane” and “indecent.”

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A Dithyrambic Poem by Platt Rogers Spencer

​A Dithyrambic Poem by Platt Rogers Spencer

Platt Rogers Spencer

Platt Rogers Spencer’s contribution to American history is not widely known, but it is right in front of your eyes. It can be seen when you drink a can of Coca Cola, or when you se e a Ford truck commercial. What is the connection you ask? In the late 1840s, Spencer created the American handwriting style known as “Spencerian Penmanship”, which utilizes dramatic embellishments and cursive elements. Spencer’s handwriting style was so influential that became the standard writing style for legal and business correspondence before the invention of the typewriter. This brings us back to the Coca Cola’s and Ford’s connection to Spencer- each of the companies logos are in Spencerian script.

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