Confederate Monuments: Dealing with Tough History

In Ulysses S. Grant’s first inaugural address in March 1869, he discussed the way in which each section of the country should come together and settle their differences after the Civil War. He stated that it should be “approached calmly, without prejudice, hate, or sectional pride, remembering that the greatest good to the greatest number…

The Humble Origins of Horse Racing in Northeastern Ohio

Recently, while researching letters from the Sutliff Collection, I discovered a letter from a man named Lyman Potter to Calvin G. Sutliff in Vernon, Ohio. In the letter, Potter asked Sutliff to train one of his horses just as he “would a race horse.” From my research, I have concluded the letter was written around 1826…

Martha Ballard: American History Through a Woman’s Perspective

During the late 1700s, Martha Ballard was a midwife living in Maine. In life, she was not famous or well known but her personal diary brought her fame after death because it revealed the obscured viewpoint of early American women. Ballard’s diary entries covered topics which included textile production, dissections, courtship and marriage, money, the Scarlet…

John Forsyth and La Amistad

  John Forsyth was born in 1780 and graduated from the College of New Jersey (later renamed Princeton University) in 1799. From 1813 to 1834, Forsyth served as a U.S. congressman, senator, and governor from Georgia. On July 1, 1834, Andrew Jackson appointed him as Secretary of State. He remained in that position during the Martin…