IntriguingHistory

HISTORY is MORE than just names and dates

Archive for the tag “ohio history”

Hancock County, West Virginia and the Start of the Civil War

Virginia, the home state of Confederate General Robert E. Lee, was notably divided during the Civil War. The growing factions were evident in the state’s most northern reaches. In May 1861, pro-Unionists in Hancock County, VA(now West Virginia), decided to organize a company of men to help fulfill President Abraham Lincoln’s call for 75,000 volunteers. The enlistments were for only three months, but those men quickly cemented their place in history by fighting in the first military land engagement of the Civil War, which catapulted Union General George B. McClellan to the national stage.

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The Humble Origins of Horse Racing in Northeastern Ohio

Letter from Lyman Potter to Calvin G. Sutliff

                Recently, while researching letters from the Sutliff Collection, I discovered a letter from a man named Lyman Potter to Calvin G. Sutliff in Vernon, Ohio. In the letter, Potter asks Sutliff to train one of his horses, just as he “would a race horse.” From my research, I have concluded the letter was written around 1826, and it represents the popularity of horse racing in America, well before the first running of the Kentucky Derby in 1875. This essay will examine the humble origins of American horse racing in Northeastern Ohio.

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Congressman Joshua R. Giddings: The Measure of a Man

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Joshua R. Giddings

On December 3nd, 1838, Joshua Reed Giddings, a lawyer and an abolitionist from Ohio’s 16th congressional district was sworn in as a member of the United States House of Representatives. That day, he met his future mentor and former President, John Quincy Adams. In his diary, Giddings goes into great detail about his first encounter with Adams. He states that Adams was…

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A Dithyrambic Poem by Platt Rogers Spencer

​A Dithyrambic Poem by Platt Rogers Spencer

Platt Rogers Spencer

Platt Rogers Spencer’s contribution to American history is not widely known, but it is right in front of your eyes. It can be seen when you drink a can of Coca Cola, or when you se e a Ford truck commercial. What is the connection you ask? In the late 1840s, Spencer created the American handwriting style known as “Spencerian Penmanship”, which utilizes dramatic embellishments and cursive elements. Spencer’s handwriting style was so influential that became the standard writing style for legal and business correspondence before the invention of the typewriter. This brings us back to the Coca Cola’s and Ford’s connection to Spencer- each of the companies logos are in Spencerian script.

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