IntriguingHistory

HISTORY is MORE than just names and dates

Archive for the tag “ohio”

The Humble Origins of Horse Racing in Northeastern Ohio

Letter from Lyman Potter to Calvin G. Sutliff

                Recently, while researching letters from the Sutliff Collection, I discovered a letter from a man named Lyman Potter to Calvin G. Sutliff in Vernon, Ohio. In the letter, Potter asks Sutliff to train one of his horses, just as he “would a race horse.” From my research, I have concluded the letter was written around 1826, and it represents the popularity of horse racing in America, well before the first running of the Kentucky Derby in 1875. This essay will examine the humble origins of American horse racing in Northeastern Ohio.

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A Cross to Bare

DISCLAIMER: This short story is purely a work of historical fiction. I wanted to write a factitious and allegorical account of slavery while incorporating Biblical undertones. This story is the result of that idea. Pay attention, and you may be able to recognize the Biblical story I am referencing. Enjoy. 

A teenage boy and his father, with their schooner anchored, sat next to their campfire along the beach of Lake Erie in the humid summer of 1837.It had been was quite a tumultuous year for Simon and his son Joshua. Simon, a widower, made his living by using his two schooners to trade salt and flour from the shores of the Western Reserve Territory in Ohio, to the canal ridden state of New York.

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The Yellow Creek Massacre

A Mingo Warrior

A Mingo Warrior

By: Louie P. Gallo

On April 30, 1774, a posse of armed colonists murdered a group of unsuspecting Native-Americans in cold blood along the banks of the Ohio River in modern day Hancock County, West Virginia. The Yellow Creek Massacre, was so significant that Thomas Jefferson mentioned it in the only book he ever published, Notes on the State of Virginia. He called the killings “inhumane” and “indecent.”

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A Dithyrambic Poem by Platt Rogers Spencer

​A Dithyrambic Poem by Platt Rogers Spencer

Platt Rogers Spencer

Platt Rogers Spencer’s contribution to American history is not widely known, but it is right in front of your eyes. It can be seen when you drink a can of Coca Cola, or when you se e a Ford truck commercial. What is the connection you ask? In the late 1840s, Spencer created the American handwriting style known as “Spencerian Penmanship”, which utilizes dramatic embellishments and cursive elements. Spencer’s handwriting style was so influential that became the standard writing style for legal and business correspondence before the invention of the typewriter. This brings us back to the Coca Cola’s and Ford’s connection to Spencer- each of the companies logos are in Spencerian script.

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